Hieronymus BOSCH


1450-1516

 

 
 
   
Renaissance Art Map
 
   
   
Hieronymus Bosch  Between Heaven And Hell
 
 
    Introduction
 
   
    Life and Milieu
 
   
    Artistic Origins and Early Biblical Scenes
 
   
    The Mirror of Man
 
   
    The Last Judgement
 
   
    The Triumph of Sin
 
   
    The Pilgrimage of Life
 
   
    The Imitation of Christ
 
   
    The Triumph of the Saint    
         

 

 

         
                 

 

 
Between Heaven And Hell
      

 
 



 

 


The Mirror of Man
 

 

  


The Seven Deadly Sins
c. 1480
Oil on panel, 120 x 150 cm
Museo del Prado, Madrid

 

 

The human condition and humanity's ultimate fate form the overall subject of this series of images. The central feature, formed of four concentric rings, symbolizes the eye of God, the pupil of which shows Christ rising from the grave displaying the wounds of his crucifixion. The second ring carries the message inscription Cave Cave Deus vivit (Beware Beware God sees). The third ring is formed of sun-like rays, while the fourth depicts the seven deadly sins in separate panels. Banderols at top and bottom carry Latin warning inscriptions. Of the four circular corner images the Four Last Things - the one depicting hell is the most revealing of Bosch's development and the deeply disturbing creatures that he increasingly uses to identify the torments of the human soul in its journey to almost inevitable damnation. Internal evidence of, for instance, dress indicates that the painting dates from around 1490, early in Bosch's middle period. Most of the scenes are not of the highest quality, but the message is clear and unequivocal.

 

  


The Seven Deadly Sins (detail)
c. 1480
Museo del Prado, Madrid


The Seven Deadly Sins (detail)
c. 1480
Museo del Prado, Madrid

 
 

 


The Seven Deadly Sins (detail)
c. 1480
Museo del Prado, Madrid

 

 

 


The Seven Deadly Sins (detail)
c. 1480
Museo del Prado, Madrid

 

 


The Seven Deadly Sins (detail)
c. 1480
Museo del Prado, Madrid

 

 


The Seven Deadly Sins (detail)
c. 1480
Museo del Prado, Madrid

 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy