History of Photography

 

 
William Talbot
(1800-1877)
 
Cameron Julla
(1815-1879)
Nadar
(1820-1910)
Muybrige Eadweard
(1830-1904)
 
Timothy O'Sullivan
(1840-1882)
 
Riis Jacob
(1849-1914)
 
Atget Eugene
(1857-1927)
 
Stieglitz  Alfred
(1864-1946)
 
Bellocg E.J.
(1873-1949)
 
Hine Levis
(1874-1940)
 
Steichen Edward
(1879-1973)
 
Coburn Alvin
(1882-1966)
 
  Cunningham Imogen
(1883-1976)
 
 



Masters of Photography

 

 
Abbott Berenice
 
Model Lisette
 
Adams Ansel
 
Outerbridge   Paul
 
Brandt Bill
 
Rodchenko Alexander
 
Brassai
 
Sexton John
 
Bravo Manuel
 
Sherman Cindy
 
Callahan Harry
 
Skrebneski Victor
 
Doisneau
 
Smith Rodney
 
Kertesz Andre
 
Sommer Frederick
 
Koudelka Josef
 
Weegee
 
Laughlin Clarence
 
Weston Edward
 
Man Ray
 
White Minor
 
Mapplethorpe Robert
 

 
 


Collections of Photography
 

 
 
 
Aframova Elena
 
Pache Philippe  
 
Avenaim Jerry
 
 Fleur de Peau
 
 Bailey David
 
 Schatz Howard
 
Chris Henry
 
 Tenneson Joyce
 
 Hernandez Paul
 
 Tucker Doug
 
 Kirkland Douglas
 
 Uelsmann Jerry
 
 McFarlane Jan
 
 Van Daele Joris
 
 Newton Helmut
 
 Warkentin Karl
 
   

 

 
 

 


Berenice Abbott


(b Springfield, OH, 17 July 1898; d 9 Dec 1991).

American photographer. She spent a term at the Ohio State University in Columbus (1917–18) and then studied sculpture independently in New York (1918–21) where she met Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray. She left the USA for Paris in 1921 where she studied at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière before attending the Kunstschule in Berlin for less than a year in 1923. From 1924 to 1926 she worked as Man Ray’s assistant and first saw photographs by Eugène Atget in Man Ray’s studio in 1925. Her first one-woman show, at the gallery Le Sacre du Printemps in Paris in 1926, was devoted to portraits of avant-garde personalities such as Jean Cocteau, James Joyce and André Gide. She continued to take portraits until leaving Paris in 1929, such as that of James Joyce (1927; see Berenice Abbott: Photographs, p. 26). After Atget’s death (1927) she bought most of his negatives and prints in 1928, and in 1929 she returned to New York. There she began a series of documentary photographs of the city and from 1935 to 1939 directed the ‘Changing New York’ project for the Works Progress Administration Federal Art Project, which resulted in the book of photographs Changing New York (1939). Like Atget’s views of Paris these covered both the people and architecture of New York in a methodical and detached way. The images in Greenwich Village Today and Yesterday (1949) were motivated by a similar spirit. She also took various portrait photographs in the 1930s and 1940s, such as that of Max Ernst (1941).

               
 


Berenice Abbott


      

1928
James Joyce

1939
     




 

   


 

1939
   

1939
       




 

1939

 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy