Neoclassicism and Romanticism

 



(Neoclassicism, Romanticism and Art Styles in 19th century - Art Map)



 




William Dyce



 


 


William Dyce


born Sept. 19, 1806, Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scot.
died Feb. 14, 1864, London


Scottish painter and pioneer of state art education in Great Britain.

Dyce studied at the Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh, and the Royal Academy schools, London. One of the first British students of early Italian Renaissance painting, he visited Italy in 1825 and 1827–28, meeting in Rome a group of young German painters, the Nazarenes. He exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy, being elected associate of the Royal Academy in 1844 and academician in 1848. In 1830–37 in Edinburgh he made portraits for a livelihood. But his Italian studies led him to anticipate the English Pre-Raphaelites in the quest for a primitivist simplicity and repose in his painting that harked back to the art of 14th- and 15th-centuryItaly.

At the time of his death Dyce was engaged in painting a series of frescoes for the Houses of Parliament, of which remain the “Baptism of Ethelbert” in the House of Lords (1846) and the “King Arthur” series (1848; unfinished) in the queen's robing room.
 




 

Madonna and Child
1827



 


The Good Shepherd




 

 


Joab Loses the Arrow of Grace
1844


 


Recollection of Pegwell Bay


 


Titian's First Essay in Colour



 


Amongst the Trees


 


Omnia Vanitas


 


King Lear and the Fool in the Storm


 


Madonna


 


Francesca da Rimini


 


The Woman of Samaria



 


Henry VI at Towton


 


Eliezer of Damascus

1860


 


Piety: The Knights of the Round Table about to Depart in Quest of the Holy Grail


 


Lamentation Over the Dead Christ
1835


 


Dante and Beatrice


 


Miss Anne Webster
1833


 


The Choristers - Design For A Stained Glass Window In Ely Cathedral
1856


 


The Man of Sorrows
1860


 


Neptune Resigning to Britannia the Empire of the Sea


 


Girl at a Casement  



 


Old Woman  



 


Boy Reclining by a Pool  


 


Cottage Interior  

 

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