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(Neoclassicism, Romanticism and Art Styles in 19th century - Art Map)



 




Alexandre Cabanel



 


 
Alexandre Cabanel

(b Montpellier, 28 Sept 1823; d Paris, 23 Jan 1889).

French painter and teacher. His skill in drawing was apparently evident by the age of 11. His father could not afford his training, but in 1839 his département gave him a grant to go to Paris. This enabled him to register at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts the following October as a pupil of François-Edouard Picot. At his first Salon in 1843 he presented Agony in the Garden (Valenciennes, Mus. B.-A.) and won second place in the Prix de Rome competition (after Léon Bénouville, also a pupil of Picot) in 1845 with Christ at the Praetorium (Paris, Ecole N. Sup. B.-A.). Both Cabanel and Bénouville were able to go to Rome, as there was a vacancy from the previous year. Cabanel’s Death of Moses (untraced), an academic composition, painted to comply with the regulations of the Ecole de Rome, was exhibited at the Salon of 1852. The pictures he painted for Alfred Bruyas, his chief patron at this time (and, like Cabanel, a native of Montpellier), showed more clearly the direction his art had taken during his stay in Italy. Albaydé, Angel of the Evening, Chiarruccia and Velleda (all in Montpellier, Mus. Fabre) were the first of many mysterious or tragic heroines painted by Cabanel and show his taste for the elegiac types and suave finish of the Florentine Mannerists.


 





 

Self-Portrait



 


Portrait Of Young Lady
 


 


Portrait of Countess E. A. Vorontsova-Dashkova
 


 


Portrait of Prince K. A. Gorchakov



 

Portrait of John William Mackay




 

The Daughter Of Jephthah




 

Paige




 

Albayde




 

Patricienne de Venise




 

The Roman Monk




 

Harmony




 

Cincinnatus Receiving Deputies of the Senate




 

Catharine Lorillard Wolfe




 

Fallen Angel




 

The Expulsion of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Paradise




 

Eve After the Fall

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