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Ts’ao YŁ


Cao Yu, Wade-Giles romanization Ts’ao YŁ, pseudonym of Wan Jiabao (b. September 24, 1910, Tianjin, China—d. December 13, 1996, Beijing), Chinese playwright who was a pioneer in huaju (“word drama”), a genre influenced by Western theatre rather than traditional Chinese drama (which is usually sung).

Wan Jiabao was educated at Nankai University in Tianjin and Qinghua University in Beijing, where he studied contemporary Chinese literature and Western drama. He taught in Baoding and Tianjin and at the National Institute of Dramatic Art in Nanjing. In 1934 his first play, the four-act tragedy Leiyu (Thunderstorm; later adapted for film [1938] and as a dance-drama [1981]), was published. When it was performed in 1935 it instantly won Cao Yu fame as a huaju writer. His next works were Richu (1936; Sunrise; adapted as an opera [1982] and for film [1938 and 1985]) and Yuanye (1937; rev. ed. 1982; “The Wilderness”; adapted for film [1981]), a story of love and revenge that clearly reflects the influence of American playwright Eugene O’Neill. Most Chinese critics declared Yuanye a failure on its first appearance, but the revised play received critical acclaim in the 1980s.

After the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War in 1937, Cao Yu moved with the drama school to Chongqing and later to Jiang’an, where he wrote Tuibian (1940; “Metamorphosis”), a patriotic work in which he expressed the hope that China would throw off the constraints of the old ways and embrace the new. He followed it with Beijingren (1940; rev. ed. 1947; “Beijing Man”; Eng. trans. Peking Man), thought by many to be one of the masterpieces of modern Chinese drama; it is powerful in both characterization and its use of symbolism. Cao Yu was appointed the director of the Beijing People’s Art Theatre in the early 1950s and was elected the chairman of the Chinese Dramatists’ Association in the early 1980s. He wrote some dramas in support of the Chinese Communist Party, but most were considered failures.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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