History of Literature








Russian literature

 


 


Vasily Trediakovsky


born February 22 (March 5, New Style), 1703, Astrakhan, Russia
died August 6 [August 17], 1768, St. Petersburg

Russian literary theoretician and poet whose writings contributed to the classical foundations of Russian literature.

The son of a poor priest, Trediakovsky became the first Russian not of the nobility to receive a humanistic education abroad, at the Sorbonne in Paris (1727–30). Soon after his return to Russia he became acting secretary of the Academy of Sciences and de facto court poet. In 1735 Trediakovsky published Novy i kratky sposob k slozheniyu rossiyskikh stikhov (“A New and Concise Method for the Composition of Russian Verses”), which discussed for the first time in Russian literature such poetic genres as the sonnet, the rondeau, the madrigal, and the ode. In 1748 appeared his Razgovor ob ortografii (“A Conversation on Orthography”), the first study of the phonetic structure of the Russian language. He continued his advocacy of poetic reform in O drevnem, srednem i novom stikhotvorenii rossiyskom (1752; “On Ancient, Middle, and New Russian Poetry”). Trediakovsky was also a prolific translator of classical authors, medieval philosophers, and French literature. His translations frequently aroused the ire of the censors, and he fell into disfavour with his Academy superiors and conservative court circles. In 1759 he was dismissed from the Academy. His last major work was a translation of Fénelon’s Les aventures de Télémaque (1766; Tilemakhida), which he rendered in Russian hexameters.
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

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