History of Literature






English literature


 


Alan Sillitoe



born March 4, 1928, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, Eng.
died April 25, 2010, London

writer, one of the so-called Angry Young Men, whose brash and angry accounts of working-class life injected new vigour into post-World War II British fiction.

The son of a tannery worker, Sillitoe worked in factories from the age of 14. In 1946 he joined the air force, and for two years he served as a radio operator in Malaya. After his return to England, X-rays revealed that he had contracted tuberculosis, and he spent several months in a hospital. Between 1952 and 1958 he lived in France and Spain. In Majorca he met the poet Robert Graves, who suggested that he write about Nottingham, and Sillitoe began work on his first published novel, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1958; filmed 1960). It was an immediate success, telling the story of a rude and amoral young labourer for whom drink and sex on Saturday night provide the only relief from the oppression of the working life.

From his short-story collection The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1959), Sillitoe helped adapt the title story into a film (1962). Later novels, such as The Death of William Posters (1965) and The Widower’s Son (1977), deal with more intellectual working-class characters. In 2001 he published Birthday, a sequel to Saturday Night and Sunday Morning. Notable short-story collections are The Ragman’s Daughter (1963; filmed 1974), Men, Women, and Children (1974), and The Second Chance (1980).

Sillitoe also wrote children’s books, poetry, and plays while continuing as a novelist. Life Without Armour, an autobiography, was published in 1995.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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