History of  Literature










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Abraham Shlonsky



Abraham Shlonsky, also spelled Avraham Shlonski (b. March 6, 1900, Poltava province, Russia [now in Ukraine]—d. May 18, 1973, Tel Aviv–Yafo, Israel), Israeli poet who founded Israel’s Symbolist school and was an innovator in using colloquial speech in Hebrew verse.

In the early 1920s Shlonsky emigrated to Palestine, becoming literary editor of various periodicals. He translated into Hebrew works by authors such as Bertolt Brecht, Nikolay Gogol, Aleksandr Pushkin, William Shakespeare, and G.B. Shaw. Much of Shlonsky’s poetry concerns the Israeli pioneer’s rejection of Western values and the emergence of Israel as a modern country. Verse collections include Shire ha-mapolet ve-ha-piyus (1938; “Songs of Defeat and Conciliation”) and ʿAl mileʾt (1947; “On Filling In”).
 

 

 
 
 
 

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