History of Literature









French literature


 


Maurice Scève

born c. 1501, Lyon, France
died 1560/64?, Lyon

French poet who was considered great in his own day, then long neglected. Reinstated by 20th-century critics and poets, chiefly for his poem cycle, Délie, Scève has often been described as the leader of the Lyonese school of writers (including Pernette du Guillet and Louise Labé), although there is no evidence of an organized school. Lyon, on the trade route between northern and southern Europe, was a centre of humanism, and Scève first achieved fame in 1533 by his “discovery” of the tomb of Petrarch’s Laura at Avignon and again in 1536 with his Blason du sourcil (“Description of an Eyebrow”), adjudged the best entry in a poetic competition held at Ferrara. This poem was later published in the anthology Les Blasons du corps féminin (“Descriptions of the Feminine Body”), often reprinted between 1537 and 1550.

Scève’s Délie, objet de plus haute vertu (1544; “Délie, Object of Highest Virtue”) is a poetic cycle of 449 highly organized decasyllabic 10-line stanzas (dizains), rich in imagery and Platonic and Petrarchan in theme and style. “Délie” (an anagram of “L’Idée,” “The Idea”), long thought to be an imaginary ideal, may have been Pernette du Guillet, whose death seems to have partly inspired Scève’s Saulsaye, églogue de la vie solitaire (1547; “Willow Row, an Eclogue on the Solitary Life”), written in retirement in the country.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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