History of Literature








German literature




 


Rudolf von Ems



From the Weltchronik: King David with scribe and musicians
(illumination from a manuscript in the Zentralbibliothek Zürich).

 

born c. 1200, Hohenems, Swabia [now in Austria]
died c. 1254, Italy

prolific and versatile Middle High German poet. Between about 1220 and 1254 he wrote five epic poems, totaling more than 93,000 lines.

Though the influence of earlier masters of the courtly epic is evident in his work—his style is modeled on Gottfried von Strassburg, while his moral outlook derives from Hartmann von Aue—Rudolf’s poems show considerable originality in subject matter. His earliest preserved poem, Der guote Gerhart (“Gerhard the Good”), is the story of a Cologne merchant who, despite his unaristocratic calling, has all the courtly qualities of an Arthurian knight. His charity and humility result in his being offered the crown of England, which he rejects. The charm and realism of this poem were not equaled in Rudolf’s other works: Barlaam und Josaphat, a Christian version of the legend of Buddha; and the three historical epics, Alexander, Willehalm von Orlens, and Weltchronik, an ambitious, uncompleted world chronicle that ends with the death of Solomon. The popularity of Rudolf’s writings can be gauged by the fact that there are more than 80 extant manuscripts and manuscript fragments of the Weltchronik alone.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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