History of Literature








A BRIEF HISTORY OF

WESTERN LITERATURE


Ancient Greek literature. Philosophical prose


 

 


Protagoras



Greek philosopher

born c. 485 bc, Abdera, Greece
died c. 410

Main
thinker and teacher, the first and most famous of the Greek Sophists.

Protagoras spent most of his life at Athens, where he considerably influenced contemporary thought on moral and political questions. Plato named one of his dialogues after him. Protagoras taught as a Sophist for more than 40 years, claiming to teach men “virtue” in the conduct of their daily lives. He is best known for his dictum “Man is the measure of all things,” probably an expression of the relativity to the individual of all perceptions and, according to some, of all judgments as well. He acquired great wealth and reputation from his teaching, prompting his appointment as lawgiver for the Athenian colony of Thurii in Italy. Though he adopted conventional moral ideas, Protagoras expressed his agnostic attitude toward belief in the gods in Concerning the Gods. He was accused of impiety, his books were publicly burned, and he was exiled from Athens about 415 bc for the rest of his life.

 

 
 
 
 
 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy