History of Literature








English literature

 


 


John Oldham


 

born Aug. 9, 1653, Shipton Moyne, Gloucestershire, Eng.
died Dec. 9, 1683, Holm Pierrepont, near Nottingham

pioneer of the imitation of classical satire in English.

Oldham was the son of a scholarly vicar who was responsible for much of his education; he also studied at Tetbury Grammar School for two years. From 1670 to 1674 he attended St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, and in 1676 he became an usher at Whitgift School, Croydon. His poems attracted the attention of the earl of Rochester, who visited him at Croydon and is said to have “much delighted” in his poetry. Oldham’s imitation of Moschus’s elegy on Bion, written at Rochester’s death, contains a touching expression of his gratitude to him. In 1677 he attempted, apparently unsuccessfully, to win recognition at court by writing a poem on the marriage of the Princess Mary to William of Orange. While a resident of London, he was on the fringe of the “court wits” and composed several satires, some obscene, to amuse this circle. He also met John Dryden, who was to mourn him in a noble elegy.

Oldham has a notable place in the development of Augustan poetry. The four Satyrs upon the Jesuits (1681), including “Garnet’s Ghost,” previously published as a broadsheet in 1679, met with considerable contemporary success and constitute his most widely known work. They are forceful but melodramatic, crowded with coarse images and uneven versification, an attempt to imitate the invective of Juvenal. While seeking patronage as a writer, Oldham earned his living by working as a private tutor. In his last year he composed a series of satirical pieces, including imitations of Juvenal and the French poet Nicolas Boileau. His satires have the novelty of being directed toward general subjects rather than being personal lampoons.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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