History of Literature







English literature




 


Henry Mackenzie




born , Aug. 26, 1745, Edinburgh
died Jan. 14, 1831, Edinburgh

Scottish novelist, playwright, poet, and editor, whose most important novel, The Man of Feeling, established him as a major literary figure in Scotland. His work had considerable influence on Sir Walter Scott, who dedicated his Waverley novels to him in 1814.

Mackenzie’s early works include imitations of traditional Scottish ballads, but, on moving to London to study law after 1765, he began to imitate English literary styles in which “sentiment” was then becoming a powerful literary influence. His mawkish novel The Man of Feeling (begun 1767, published 1771) was a best-seller. Settling in Scotland from 1768, Mackenzie wrote two more novels: The Man of the World (1773), portraying a villainous hero, and Julia de Roubigné (1777), imitating Richardson’s Clarissa. He also wrote a play, edited two periodicals, and helped found learned societies.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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