History of Literature







 

Eastern Literature




Chinese Literature



 


Li YŁ

Li Yu, Wade-Giles romanization Li YŁ, also known as Li Houzhu, courtesy name (zi) Chongguang (b. 937, Jinling [now Nanjing, Jiangsu province], China—d. August 15(?), 978, Bianjing [now Kaifeng], Henan province), Chinese poet and the last ruler of the Southern Tang dynasty (937–975).

Li Yu succeeded his poet father, Li Jing, as ruler in 961. His country was invaded in 974 by Taizu, founder of the Song dynasty (960–1279). When Li Yu’s capital, Jinling, fell the next year, he surrendered and was taken to the Song capital, Bianjing. There he was given a nominal title, but his life was one of misery. After Taizu died in 976, his brother and successor, Taizong, had Li Yu poisoned.

Li Yu was a master of the ci song form. More than 30 of his lyrics have survived. His earlier poems reflect the gay and luxurious life at his court, though some are tinged with romantic melancholy. His middle poems are those written from the time of his wife’s death (964) to his captivity (975). He achieved his greatness, however, in his later poems in which he expressed his grief and despair at the loss of his kingdom. The direct and powerful emotional appeal of these later works has won them lasting popularity. In addition to being a poet, Li Yu was also a painter, calligrapher, collector, and musician.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

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