History of Literature










French literature



 


Levi ben Gershom (Gersonides)
 

also called Gersonides, Leo De Bagnols, Leo Hebraeus, or (by acronym) Ralbag

born 1288, Bagnols-sur-Cèze, Fr.
died 1344

French Jewish mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, and Talmudic scholar.

In 1321 Levi wrote his first work, Sefer ha-mispar (“Book of the Number”), dealing with arithmetical operations, including extraction of roots. In De sinibus, chordis et arcubus (1342; “On Sines, Chords, and Arcs”) he presented an original derivation of the sine theorem for plane triangles and tables of sines calculated to five decimal places. On the request of Philip of Vitry, bishop of Meaux, he composed a book on geometry, preserved only in Latin translation, De numeris harmonicis (1343; “The Harmony of Numbers”), containing commentaries on the first five books of Euclid and original axioms.

Influenced by the works of Aristotle and the 12th-century Islāmic philosopher Averroës, Levi wrote Sefer ha-hekkesh ha-yashar (1319; Latin Liber syllogismi recti; “Book of Proper Analogy”), criticizing several arguments of Aristotle; he also wrote commentaries on the works of both philosophers.

Although Levi’s biblical commentaries are complex, he presupposed an audience familiar with these commentaries, medieval astronomical literature, and the works of Averroës when he wrote (1317–29) his major work, Sefer milḥamot Adonai (“The Book of the Wars of the Lord”; partial trans. Die Kämpfe Gottes, 2 vol.). Divided into six parts, the work treats exhaustively of the immortality of the soul; dreams, divination, and prophecy; divine knowledge; providence; celestial spheres and separate intellects and their relationship with God; and the creation of the world, miracles, and the criteria by which one recognizes the true prophet. In the fifth part, he describes “Jacob’s staff,” an instrument that he used to measure the angular distance between celestial bodies.

Levi’s work has often been criticized because of his bold expression and the unconventionality of his thought, which continued to exercise wide influence into the 19th century.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 

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