History of Literature












English literature




 


William Law

born 1686, King’s Cliffe, Northamptonshire, Eng.
died April 9, 1761, King’s Cliffe

English author of influential works on Christian ethics and mysticism.

He entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in 1705 and in 1711 was elected a fellow there and was ordained. Upon the accession of George I in 1714, however, he was dismissed from Cambridge as a nonjuror (refusing to take an oath of allegiance). By 1727 he was serving as tutor to Edward Gibbon, father of the historian. From 1740 Law lived in retirement at his birthplace.

His chief contribution lies in his delineation of the Christian ethical ideal for human life and its actualization through the disciplined practices of private mysticism. His Practical Treatise Upon Christian Perfection (1726) and his Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life (1728), considered his best work, both espouse a mild mysticism within the bounds of the normative Christian tradition. His stress upon the union between the Creator and the creature, however, as expressed in The Way to Divine Knowledge (1752), The Spirit of Prayer (1749), and The Spirit of Love (1752), has seldom found acceptance among Christian moral theologians. Each of these works was strongly criticized by such contemporaries as John Wesley. Nevertheless John and Charles Wesley both expressed an indebtedness to Law’s work.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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