History of  Literature










A BRIEF HISTORY OF

WESTERN LITERATURE





Hebrew literature



 
 

 


Isaac ben Solomon Israeli


 

Isaac ben Solomon Israeli, Arabic Abū Ya-ʿqūb Isḥaq Ibn Sulaymān Al-isrāʾīlī, also called Isaac Israeli, or Isaac The Elder (b. 832/855, Egypt—d. 932/955, Al-Qayrawān, Tunisia), Jewish physician and philosopher, widely reputed in the European Middle Ages for his scientific writings and regarded as the father of medieval Jewish Neoplatonism. Although there is considerable disagreement about his birth and death dates, he is known to have lived more than 100 years and never to have married or to have had children.

Israeli first gained note as an oculist, maintaining a practice near Cairo until about 904, when he became court physician in Al-Qayrawān to the last Aghlabid prince, Ziyādat Allāh. He also studied medicine there under Isḥāq ibn ʿAmrān al-Baghdādī, with whom he sometimes has been confused.

Some five years after his arrival, Israeli entered into the service of al-Mahdī, the founder of the North African Fāṭimid dynasty (909–1171), whose capital was Al-Qayrawān. At the request of the caliph, Israeli wrote eight medical works in Arabic. All were translated into Latin in 1087 by the monk Constantine, who claimed to have written them himself. Not until 1515 was their true authorship uncovered, and the works were republished in Lyon under the title Omnia Isaac Opera (“All of Isaac’s Works”); the editor, however, mistakenly included the writings of other medical scholars as well. Israeli’s scientific works include standard treatises on fevers, urine, pharmacology, ophthalmology, and ailments and treatments. He wrote also on logic and psychology, showing particular insight in the field of perception.

Of his philosophical writings, Kitāb al-ḥudūd (Hebrew: Sefer ha-gevulim, “The Book of Definitions”) is best known. Beginning with a discussion of Aristotle’s four types of inquiry, Israeli goes on to present 56 definitions, including definitions of wisdom, intellect, soul, nature, reason, love, locomotion, and time. Others of his philosophical works include Sefer ha-ruʾaḥ ve-ha-nefesh (“Treatise on Spirit and Soul”), probably part of a larger exegetical effort, and Kitāb al-jawāhir (“Book of Substances”).

Israeli’s thought was influenced heavily by two major sources: the great 9th-century Islāmic philosopher al-Kindī and a lost pseudo-Aristotelian treatise on such matters as the source of being, the nature of the intellect, and the course of the soul. Israeli’s interpretation of eschatological matters in the light of Neoplatonic mysticism was to influence Solomon ibn Gabriol in the 10th century and other later Jewish philosophers.
 

 

 
 
 
 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy