History of Literature







English literature



 

 


Nicholas Grimald

 

born 1519/20, Huntingdonshire, Eng.
died c. 1559

English scholar and poet, best known as a contributor to Songes and Sonettes (1557), known as Tottel’s Miscellany, an anthology of contemporary poetry he may have edited.

Grimald was educated at Cambridge and Oxford universities. He graduated with an M.A. from Oxford (1543) and was appointed to a lectureship in theology at Christ Church College, Oxford, in 1547. He was licensed as a preacher in 1551–52 and named chaplain to Nicholas Ridley, bishop of London. After the accession of the Catholic queen Mary I in 1553, Ridley was imprisoned, removed from his bishopric, and in 1554 executed. In 1555 Grimald was also imprisoned but was released, presumably because he recanted. In 1558 he is said to have returned to the Protestant belief.

The first edition of Tottel’s Miscellany, published in June 1557, contained 40 poems by Grimald, including two early examples of English blank verse. Only 10 of his poems appeared in the second edition (published two months later) and in later editions, perhaps because of his religious inconstancy. Grimald also wrote two plays in Latin: a tragicomedy, Christus Redivivus (1543), produced at Oxford, and a tragedy about John the Baptist, Archipropheta (1548), produced at Cambridge. His plays and his surviving poems, edited by L.R. Merrill, were published in 1925.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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