History of Literature






English literature


 


Sir John Denham



born 1615, Dublin, Ire.
died March 10, 1669, London, Eng.

poet who established as a new English genre the leisurely meditative poem describing a particular landscape.

Educated at the University of Oxford, Denham was admitted to the bar, but he was already actively writing. He had translated six books of the Aeneid, parts of which were later printed; but he made his reputation with The Sophy, a blank-verse historical tragedy acted in 1641, and with Cooper’s Hill, a poem published in 1642. During the English Civil Wars, he was engaged at home and abroad in the cause of Charles II. Made a knight of the Bath and elected to the Royal Society after the Restoration in 1660, he also served as a member of Parliament. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Denham’s poetry is essentially didactic. Its strength lies in its gravely reflective ethical solidity, and it achieves an expression of balance and unity that is developed out of a theory of the harmony of opposites. He helped develop the closed heroic couplet (a couplet rhyming aa and containing a complete idea, not dependent upon the preceding or following couplet). Denham greatly increased the popularity of that form with Cooper’s Hill, a new type of descriptive landscape verse that was imitated by English poets for the next 100 years.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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