History of Literature






English literature


 


John Davidson

born April 11, 1857, Barrhead, Renfrewshire, Scot.
died March 23, 1909, Penzance, Cornwall, Eng.


Scottish poet and playwright whose best work shows him a master of the narrative lyrical ballad.

After studying at the University of Edinburgh, Davidson became a teacher, meanwhile writing a number of blank-verse dramas that failed to win recognition. In 1890 he went to London, practiced journalism, and wrote novels and short stories to earn a living, finally establishing himself with Fleet Street Eclogues (1893), Ballads and Songs (1894), and a second series of eclogues (1896). A series of “Testaments,” written toward the end of his life, were long dramatic monologues in blank verse incorporating scientific language. They expressed his idiosyncratic vision, which combined scientific materialism and romantic will in the belief that man has been created to express himself to the utmost. Davidson completed two plays (1907, 1908) of a trilogy on this theme. Exhausted by his efforts to support his family and increasingly frustrated by the public response to his work, he committed suicide by drowning. His poems vary widely in tone and execution, the best known being “Thirty Bob a Week.”
 

 
 
 
 
 

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