History of Literature









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Gabriello Chiabrera



Gabriello Chiabrera, (b. June 18, 1552, Savona [Italy]—d. Oct. 14, 1638, Savona), Italian poet whose introduction of new metres and a Hellenic style enlarged the range of lyric forms available to later Italian poets.

Chiabrera studied philosophy in Rome, lived for a time in the household of a cardinal, and then returned to Savona, where civic and diplomatic posts and the protection of several princes gave him the leisure to write a prodigious amount of poetry in various forms: lyrics, narrative poems, eclogues, epitaphs, epics, tragedies, and satires. His canzones (lyrics derived from Provençal poetry) introduced stylistic innovations. His best works, however, are his graceful, musical canzonettas; these are lighthearted compositions, apparently influenced by the 16th-century French Pléiade poets, in which he experiments with the introduction of 4-, 5-, 6-, 8-, and 9-syllable lines (rather than the 11- and 7-syllable lines of previous practice) and with varieties of syllabic stress. Because of the success of Chiabrera’s experiments, subsequent poets had a choice of many new lyric types. His work was imitated by the 18th-century Italian Arcadian poets and was admired by the 19th-century Romantic poet William Wordsworth, who translated some of his epitaphs.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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