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English literature



 

 


Sir John Cheke


born June 16, 1514, Cambridge, Eng.
died Sept. 13, 1557, London

English humanist and supporter of the Protestant Reformation who, as the poet John Milton said, “taught Cambridge and King Edward Greek” and who, with his friend Sir Thomas Smith, discovered the proper pronunciation of ancient Greek. Through his teaching he made the University of Cambridge the centre of the “new learning” and the Reformed religion. Henry VIII made him the first regius professor of Greek at Cambridge. He was tutor to Prince Edward (1544), who as King Edward VI knighted him in 1552.

On the accession of Mary I (1553), Cheke lost the last of a series of government positions, was imprisoned briefly, and fled abroad. There he published his letters on Greek pronunciation. In 1556 he was captured in Belgium and confined to the Tower of London. Faced with death, he recanted his Protestantism publicly and is said to have died of shame.

One of the most erudite men of his time, Cheke was an indefatigable translator. His English works are of little importance, except for their avoidance of foreign words and for his reformed phonetic spelling, which make his letters some of the best plain prose of the period.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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