History of Literature









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Carlo Cassola



 

Carlo Cassola, (b. March 17, 1917, Rome, Italy—d. Jan. 29, 1987, Monte Carlo, Monaco), Italian Neorealist novelist who portrayed the landscapes and the ordinary people of rural Tuscany in simple prose. The lack of action and the emphasis on detail in his books caused him to be regarded as a forerunner of the French nouveau roman, or antinovel.

After studying at the University of Rome, Cassola fought with the Resistance during World War II. The period formed the background of some of his best-known works, among them the short-story collection Il taglio del bosco (1955; “Timber Cutting”) and the novel Fausto e Anna (1952; Fausto and Anna), both semiautobiographical. In 1960 Cassola won the Strega Prize for La ragazza di Bube (Bebo’s Girl; film, 1964). These austere novels portray with sympathy and restraint individuals—especially women—whose lives are bleak and unfulfilled. Cassola’s later concern with the environment and the threat of nuclear war was reflected in essays and in the novel Il paradiso degli animali (1979; “Animals’ Paradise”).

 

 
 
 
 

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