History of Literature






English literature


 


Thomas Carew

born 1594/95, West Wickham, Kent, Eng.
died March 22, 1639/40, London

English poet and first of the Cavalier song writers.

Educated at the University of Oxford and at the Middle Temple, London, Carew served as secretary at embassies in Venice, The Hague, and Paris. In 1630 Carew received a court appointment and became server at table to the king. The Earl of Clarendon considered him as “a person of pleasant and facetious wit” among a brilliant circle of friends that included the playwright Ben Jonson.

Carew’s only masque, Coelum Britannicum, was performed by the king and his gentlemen in 1634 and published the same year. Music for it was composed by Henry Lawes, who, among others, set some of Carew’s songs to music.

Carew’s poems, circulated in manuscript, were amatory lyrics or occasional poems addressed to members of the court circle, notable for their ease of language and skillful control of mood and imagery. His longest poem was the sensuous Rapture, but his lyrics are among the most complex and thoughtful of any produced by the Cavalier poets. He was a meticulous workman, and his own verses addressed to Ben Jonson show that he was proud to share Jonson’s creed of painstaking perfection. He greatly admired the poems of John Donne, whom he called king of “the universal monarchy of wit” in his elegy on Donne (deemed the outstanding piece of poetic criticism of the age). Carew was also indebted to Italian poets, particularly Giambattista Marino, whose libertine spirit, brilliant wit, and technical facility were much akin to his own, and on whose work he based several of his lyrics. He translated a number of the Psalms and is said to have died with expressions of remorse for a life of libertinism. His poems were published a few weeks after his death. The definitive edition is The Poems of Thomas Carew, with His Masque “Coelum Britannicum,” edited by Rhodes Dunlap (1949).
 

 

 
 
 
 

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