History of Literature











German literature





 


Johann Jakob Breitinger


born March 1, 1701, Zürich, Switz.
died Dec. 13, 1776, Zürich

Swiss-German writer, one of the most influential 18th-century literary critics in the German-speaking world.

He studied theology and became professor at the Collegium Carolinum in Zürich. He lectured on Hebrew, Greek, Latin, logic, and rhetoric; showed excellence as a philologist in many editions; and advocated education on humanist lines (Zürich school reform, 1765–75).

Under the inspiration of The Spectator papers of England’s Joseph Addison and Richard Steele, Breitinger founded and wrote essays for the weekly Discourse der Mahlern (1721–23). In Critische Dichtkunst (1740), one of the most important of his many publications, he attacked the narrowly rationalist Dichtkunst (1730) of the Leipzig “literary pope” Johann Christoph Gottsched. Breitinger stressed the place of the imagination and the wonderful in poetry; fired the German-speaking public with enthusiasm for Homer; and spread the ideas of John Locke, Lord Shaftesbury, and Alexander Pope. He was visited by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and others, and his pupils included the poet and prose writer Johann Kaspar Lavater and the writer and educator Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi.
 

 

 
 
 
 

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