History of Literature






English literature


 


Osbern Bokenam

 

born Oct. 6, 1393?, Old Buckenham?, Norfolk, Eng.
died c. 1447

English poet and friar best known as the author of a verse collection entitled Legends of Holy Women.

Little is known of Bokenam’s life. He traveled often to Italy, living for several years in Venice and later making pilgrimages to Rome and other cities. He made his home, however, in an Augustinian convent in Suffolk. At least two works in addition to the legends have been attributed to Bokenam.

The work on which his reputation stands is an approximately 10,000-line poem written in the Middle English Suffolk dialect. It consists of three stanza forms—a 10-syllable rhymed couplet, ottava rima, and a seven-line alternately rhymed stanza—in which Bokenam relates the legends of 12 women saints (Agatha, Agnes, Anne, Cecilia, Christina, Dorothy, Elizabeth of Hungary, Faith, Katherine of Alexandria, Lucy, Margaret, and Mary Magdalene) and of the 11,000 virgins of the legend of Saint Ursula. The prologues to the individual legends are more lively than the legends themselves, which are closely translated from Latin originals. The first of the legends, of St. Margaret, was written for Bokenam’s friend Thomas Burgh, and some of the other legends were dedicated to noblewomen of Bokenam’s acquaintance. The only surviving copy of the manuscript is in the British Library.

Bokenam was familiar with the poetry of John Lydgate and is thought to have been inspired by Geoffrey Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women, but his chief source was the Legenda aurea (Golden Legend) of Jacobus de Voragine.
 

 

 
     
   
 

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