History of Literature










American literature


 


Maxwell Anderson





 

Maxwell Anderson, (b. Dec. 15, 1888, Atlantic, Pa., U.S.—d. Feb. 28, 1959, Stamford, Conn.), prolific playwright noted for his efforts to make verse tragedy a popular form.

Anderson was educated at the University of North Dakota and Stanford University. He collaborated with Laurence Stallings in the World War I comedy What Price Glory? (1924), his first hit, a realistically ribald and profane view of World War I. Saturday’s Children (1927), about the marital problems of a young couple, was also very successful. Anderson’s prestige was increased by two ambitious historical dramas in verse—Elizabeth the Queen (1930) and Mary of Scotland (1933)—and by a success of a very different nature, his humorous Pulitzer Prize-winning prose satire, Both Your Houses (1933), an attack on venality in the U.S. Congress. He reached the peak of his career with Winterset (1935), a poetic drama set in his own times. A tragedy inspired by the Sacco and Vanzetti case of the 1920s and set in the urban slums, it deals with the son of a man who has been unjustly condemned to death, who seeks revenge and vindication of his father’s name. High Tor (1936), a romantic comedy in verse, expressed the author’s displeasure with modern materialism. Collaborating with the German refugee composer Kurt Weill (1900–50), Anderson also wrote for the musical theatre a play based on early New York history, Knickerbocker Holiday (1938), and Lost in the Stars (1949), a dramatization of Alan Paton’s South African novel Cry, the Beloved Country. His last play, The Bad Seed (1954), was a dramatization of William March’s novel about an evil child.
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

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