Baroque and Rococo
 


     

Baroque and Rococo Art Map






Esaias van de Velde

David Bailly

Jan III van de Velde

Abraham van Beyeren



see collection:


Jacob van Ruisdael


Ambrosius Bosschaert


Willem Heda (Claesz
)


Pieter Claesz


Willem Kalf


 



 


DUTCH LANDSCAPE PAINTING



The development of landscape painting in the Netherlands was stimulated by a desire to emulate the Flemish masters. Haarlem was an important centre for this new approach and it was here that Esaias van de Velde (c. 1591-1630), who supported a more "realistic" approach to landscape painting, was working. By the 1620s, he had found a like-minded contemporary in Hercules Pietersz Seghcrs (1589/90-1633/38), a talented artist whose paintings and etchings depicted views taken directly from nature as well as imaginary landscapes — some incorporating erotic elements of a type that later appealed to Rembrandt. Jacob van Ruisdael (c.1628-82), one of the most outstanding Dutch landscape painters, was much admired by 18th-century and Romantic artists.


 

van de Velde
 

Dutch family of artists. Esaias van de Velde was the second son of Cathalyne van Schorle and the painter and art dealer Hans van den Velde (1552–1609), a Protestant who fled religious persecution in Antwerp and settled in Amsterdam in 1585. On his father’s death, Esaias, a painter, draughtsman and etcher, moved to Haarlem with his mother, and the same year he married Katelyna Maertens, with whom he had four children: Jan (b 1614), Esaias the younger (b 1615), Anthonie the younger (1617–72) and a daughter, Jacquemijntgen (b 1621). Both Esaias the younger and Anthonie the younger became artists, the latter a still-life painter named after his uncle, the Antwerp painter Anthonie van den Velde the elder (b c. 1557). Esaias’s older brother, Jan van de Velde I (1568–1623), was a famous calligrapher, who moved from Antwerp to Rotterdam after his marriage in 1592. His eldest son, (2) Jan van de Velde II, was a painter, draughtsman and printmaker, like his uncle. He had a son, Jan van de Velde III (1619/20–62), who became a still-life painter. Both Esaias and Jan played an important role in the development of naturalistic Dutch landscapes in the 17th century.

 

Esaias van de Velde

(b Amsterdam, bapt 17 May 1591; d The Hague, bur 18 Nov 1630).

Painter, draughtsman and etcher. He probably received his earliest training from his father. It is also possible that he studied with the Antwerp painter Gillis van Coninxloo, who moved to Amsterdam in 1595 (ten years after Esaias’s father). He may also have trained with David Vinckboons, whose work shows similarities with that of Esaias. Esaias became a member of the Haarlem Guild of St Luke in 1612, the same year as Willem Buytewech and the landscape painter Hercules Segers. During this Haarlem period Esaias had two pupils, Jan van Goyen and Pieter de Neijn (1597–1639), but by 1618 he had moved with his family to The Hague, where he joined the Guild of St Luke in October of that year.

 


Esaias van de Velde
Landscape

1622
Oil on oak panel, 28 x 34 cm
Private collection

 

 


Esaias van de Velde
The Joy of Ice on the Wallgraben

1618
Wood, 28,8 x 50,4 cm
Alte Pinakothek, Munich
 

 


Esaias van de Velde
Ferry Boat

1622
Oil on panel, 76 x 113 cm
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam


 


Esaias van de Velde
Wiew of the Zierikzee
1618

 


Esaias van de Velde
Merry Company Banqueting on a Terrace
1615

 


Esaias van de Velde
Winter Landscape

1623
Oil on wood, 25,9 x 30,4 cm
National Gallery, London

 


Esaias van de Velde
Battle Scene in an Open Landscape

1614
Oil on panel, 55 x 87 cm
Private collection
 

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Roelant Savery
Blumenstraub
1612


STILL LIFE

By 1610, Roelant Savery had introduced flower painting to Utrecht. It proved to be a popular genre, and Ambrosius Bosschaert (1573-1621), an outstanding still-life painter, had considerable success with his flower paintings. The vanitas theme, usually involving a penitent and sorrowing figure surrounded by symbols of the transitory nature of earthly life such as a skull, candle, or rose, was a favourite of Leiden artists, and also of David Bailly (c.1584-1657). Willem Claesz. Heda (C.1594-C.1682) and Pieter Claesz (1597/98-1661), who both worked in Haarlem, dealt with the fleeting nature of human life, painting in subdued colours; they influenced Jan III van de Velde (c. 1620-62). In contrast, the splendid still lifes painted in the second half of the century by Willem Kalf (1619-93) and Abraham van Beyeren (1620/21-90) are full of rich colour and light effects, skilfully depicting various materials. The Dutch love of nature and exploration meant that painters were keen to depict a variety of subjects, especially botanical.
 

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David Bailly

(b Leiden, 1584; d Leiden, Oct 1657).

Dutch painter and draughtsman. The son of a Flemish immigrant who was a calligrapher and fencing-master, Bailly was apprenticed to a local surgeon-painter and then to Cornelius van der Voort (1576–1624), a portrait painter in Amsterdam. In the winter of 1608 he started out as a journeyman, spending a year in Hamburg and then travelling through several German cities to Venice and Rome. On the return voyage he visited several courts in Germany, working for local princes, including the Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel. While no works survive from the immediate period following his return to the Netherlands in 1613, descriptions in old sale catalogues suggest that he may have produced history paintings in the manner of his contemporaries Pieter Lastman and the Pynas brothers.

 

 


David Bailly
Self-Portrait with Vanitas Symbols

1651
Oil on wood, 65 x 97,5 cm
Stedelijk Museum De Lakenhal, Leiden

 

 

David Bailly
Vanitas Still Life with Portrait
ca. 1650

 

 

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Jan III van de Velde
Still Life: A Goblet of Wine,
Oysters and Lemons

1656


Jan Jansz van de Velde III

(c. 1620 - 1662)
 


Jan III van de Velde
Bodegon con fuente china, copa, cuchillo, panes y fruta

 

 


Jan III van de Velde
Still life with tall beer glass

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Abraham van Beyeren
Still-Life

Abraham van Beyeren

(b The Hague, 1620–21; d Overschie, 1690).

Dutch painter. He painted seascapes as well as fruit, flower, fish, game and banquet still-lifes. He almost always signed these works with his monogram AVB, but he dated only a few. This, together with the fact that he painted diverse subjects simultaneously and his style changed little, makes it difficult to establish a chronology. He became a master in The Hague in 1640 and was related by marriage to the fish painter Pieter de Putter (before 1600–59). Van Beyeren lived in Delft from 1657 to 1661 and was again in The Hague between 1663 and 1669. He was then recorded in Amsterdam, Alkmaar and Gouda before settling in Overschie in 1678.

 

 


Abraham van Beyeren
Large Still-life with Lobster

1653
Oil on canvas, 125,5 x 105,1 cm
Alte Pinakothek, Munich

 

 


Abraham van Beyeren
Banquet Still-Life with a Mouse

1667
Oil on canvas
County Museum of Art, Los Angeles

 


Abraham van Beyeren
Still-Life

Oil on canvas, 87 x 107 cm
Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerp

 


Abraham van Beyeren
Banquet Still-Life
Oil on canvas, 99,5 x 120,5 cm
Mauritshuis, The Hague

 


Abraham van Beyeren
Still-life with Fishes

Oil on canvas, 125 x 153 cm
Gemaldegalerie, Dresden
 

see collection:

Jacob van Ruisdael

Ambrosius Bosschaert

Willem Heda (Claesz
)

Pieter Claesz

Willem Kalf

 

 

 

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