Gothic Art









 

 

 Gothic Art Map
 
 Gothic Art
 
 Introduction Benedetto Antelami Taddeo Gaddi Vitale da Bologna
 Architecture in France Giovanni di Balduccio Giotto di Bondone Guariento d'Arpo
 Architecture in Germany Jacobello Dalle Masegne Pietro Lorenzetti Giusto de' Menabuoi
 Architecture in Italy Corenzo Maitani Ambrogio Lorenzetti Barnaba da Modena
 Architecture in England Andrea da Firenze Giovanni da Milano Melchior Broederlam
 Stained Glass Filippo Rusiti Gentile da Fabriano Nicolas de Bataille
 Arnolfo di Cambio Ferrer Bassa Pucelle Jean Bayeux Tapestry
 Nicola Pisano Pietro Cavallini Altichiera da Zevio Matthew Paris
 Giovanni Pisano Cimabue Tomasso da Modena Master Boucicaut
 Tino di Camaino Duccio di Buonisegna Traini Francesco Illuminated Manuscripts
 Andrea Pisano Simone Martini Giovannino de' Grassi Master Hohenfurt
 Claus Sluter Maso di Banco Roberto Oderisi Henri Belechose
 
 Exploration: Revelations (Art of the Apocalypse)
 
 Exploration: Gothic Era  (Gothic and Early Renaissance)
 

 


ARCHITECTURE
 





Architecture in Germany
 

 

 

THE PARLER FAMILY

The Parlers were an important German family of masons in the 14th century. Heinrich I (b. C.1300), who trained on the site of Cologne Cathedral, built the Heiligkreuzkirche at Schwabisch-Gmuncl, where he was master mason and responsible for the late Gothic German style. One of his sons, Peter (1333-99), was a leading figure of the late Gothic European style. After his apprenticeship at Schwabisch-Gmiind with his father, he worked in Strasbourg. Cologne, and Nuremberg, before being summoned to Prague to finish the cathedral started by Matthias of Arras. Peter introduced new ideas that connected the windowed triforium arcade to the main upper windows, and developed intricate rib patterns for the vaulting. He was then employed by Charles IV in the most important Prague workshops. Peter's son Wenzel worked on Vienna Cathedral, and another family member. Heinrich III, is recorded as having worked on Milan Cathedral in 1392.

 

Cologne Cathedral

Cologne, Germany,

begun in 1248.


Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

 


Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

 

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.


COLOGNE CATHEDRAL

Cologne Cathedral
(German:
Kölner Dom) is one of the most well-known architectural monuments in Germany and has been Cologne's most famous landmark for centuries. Construction of the gothic church began in the 13th century and took, with interruptions, more than 600 years. The two towers are 157m tall, the cathedral is 144m long and 86m wide. It was built on the site of a 4th century Roman temple, a square edifice known as the 'oldest cathedral' and commissioned by Maternus, the first Christian bishop of Cologne. The present cathedral was built to house the relics of the Magi, brought to Cologne from Italy by Archbishop Rainald von Dassel in 1164. The foundation stone was laid on August 15, 1248, by Archbishop Konrad von Hochstaden. The choir was consecrated in 1322. After this initial rapid progress, construction work gradually came to a standstill, and by the year 1560, only a torso had been built. It was only with 19th century romantic enthusiasm for the Middle Ages and the commitment of the Prussian Court that construction work resumed in 1842 with the addition of the towers and other substantial parts of the cathedral. The completion of Germany's largest cathedral was celebrated as a national event in 1880, 632 years after construction had began. The celebration was attended by Emperor Wilhelm I. In the end, the outer appearance remained faithful to the original medieval plans; however, the roof was a modern steel construction. At its completion, the Cologne cathedral was the tallest building in the world, having taken over from the cathedral of Rouen. In 1889, it lost the title to Mole Antonelliana, the cathedral of Turin. For a small fee it is possible to climb a spiral staircase to a viewing platform about 98 metres above the ground. The cathedral suffered 14 hits by World War II bombs; reconstruction was completed in 1956.
 


Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.
 

 

 

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

 

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

 

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248. Interior.

 

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

 

 

 

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

 

 

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

 

 

 

Cologne Cathedral, begun in 1248.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sankt Lozenz Kirche Cathedral

Nurnberg, Bavaria, Germany
 

 
 

Sankt Lozenz Kirche Cathedral

 

 

Sankt Lozenz Kirche Cathedral

Sankt Lozenz Kirche Cathedral

 

 

 

Sankt Lozenz Kirche Cathedral

 

 

 

 

 

 

Church of Our Dear Lady

Nurnberg, Bavaria, Germany

 
 

Church of Our Dear Lady

 

 

 

Church of Our Dear Lady

   

 

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