Gothic Art








 

 

 Gothic Art Map
 
 Gothic Art
 
 Introduction Benedetto Antelami Taddeo Gaddi Vitale da Bologna
 Architecture in France Giovanni di Balduccio Giotto di Bondone Guariento d'Arpo
 Architecture in Germany Jacobello Dalle Masegne Pietro Lorenzetti Giusto de' Menabuoi
 Architecture in Italy Corenzo Maitani Ambrogio Lorenzetti Barnaba da Modena
 Architecture in England Andrea da Firenze Giovanni da Milano Melchior Broederlam
 Stained Glass Filippo Rusiti Gentile da Fabriano Nicolas de Bataille
 Arnolfo di Cambio Ferrer Bassa Pucelle Jean Bayeux Tapestry
 Nicola Pisano Pietro Cavallini Altichiera da Zevio Matthew Paris
 Giovanni Pisano Cimabue Tomasso da Modena Master Boucicaut
 Tino di Camaino Duccio di Buonisegna Traini Francesco Illuminated Manuscripts
 Andrea Pisano Simone Martini Giovannino de' Grassi Master Hohenfurt
 Claus Sluter Maso di Banco Roberto Oderisi Henri Belechose
 
 Exploration: Revelations (Art of the Apocalypse)
 
 Exploration: Gothic Era  (Gothic and Early Renaissance)
 

 


SCULPTURE
 



Claus Sluter
 
 

THE CHARTERHOUSE OF CHAMPMOL

Founded as a family mausoleum by Philip the Bold in 1383. the Charterhouse of Champmol near Dijon was one of the most important religions and artistic centres of the dukedom of Burgundy during the late Gothic era. Today, the site of the destroyed charterhouse is occupied by a psychiatric hospital, but some important works still survive, such as the facade of the church and the Moses' Well, which was carved by Claus Sluter during the last ten years of the 14th century.
These, together with the duke's tomb and its pleurants (weepers), now housed in the Dijon Museum, are among some of the greatest European masterpieces of late Gothic naturalism. The town museum still preserves four panels, painted tor the altarpiece of Champmol, showing the Life of the Virgin by the Flemish artist Melchior Broederlam from Ypres.


Melchior Broederlam,
Flight into Egypt,
side panel of an altarpiece,
c 1399.
Musee des Beaux-Arts,
Dijon, France.
 

 




Claus Sluter (1360-1406)

Well of Moses
1395-1406
Musee Archeologique, Dijon

Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Well of Moses: Moses
1395-1406
Musee Archeologique, Dijon

 
 

       


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Well of Moses:
Moses


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Well of Moses: Prophet King David and Jeremiah.


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Well of Moses: Prophets Daniel and  Isaiah.
 


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Well of Moses


                         


Claus Sluter


(b Haarlem, c. 1360; d Dijon, 1406).
Netherlandish sculptor, active in Burgundy. He formulated the 15th-century Burgundian style and strongly influenced northern Renaissance sculpture. The name Claes de Slutere van Herlam appears in the guild list of the Brussels stone-cutters and masons about 1379. After possibly training in a family workshop in Haarlem, his formal training probably took place after he arrived in Brussels. This would make a birth date of c. 1360 more probable than 1340, as has been suggested. The various changes in the spelling of Sluter’s name, his continued association with contemporaries in the guild list, and the influence of Brussels artists on his work, all indicate that he spent a considerable length of time there.


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Christ.

 

 


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Well of Moses: Angel


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Well of Moses: Angel

 

 

Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Memorial to Philip the Bold
Stone, 1389-1406
Charterhouse of Champmol, Dijon

   
   

Claus Sluter (1360-1406)
Memorial to Philip the Bold
Stone, 1389-1406
Charterhouse of Champmol, Dijon

 

 

 
 






 


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)

Tomb of Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy
Marble, 1390-1406
Musee Archeologique, Dijon


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)

Tomb of Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy
Marble, 1390-1406
Musee Archeologique, Dijon

 
 


Claus Sluter (1360-1406)

Tomb of Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, (detail)
Marble, 1390-1406
Musee Archeologique, Dijon

 

 

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