Gothic Art








 

 

 Gothic Art Map
 
 Gothic Art
 
 Introduction Benedetto Antelami Taddeo Gaddi Vitale da Bologna
 Architecture in France Giovanni di Balduccio Giotto di Bondone Guariento d'Arpo
 Architecture in Germany Jacobello Dalle Masegne Pietro Lorenzetti Giusto de' Menabuoi
 Architecture in Italy Corenzo Maitani Ambrogio Lorenzetti Barnaba da Modena
 Architecture in England Andrea da Firenze Giovanni da Milano Melchior Broederlam
 Stained Glass Filippo Rusiti Gentile da Fabriano Nicolas de Bataille
 Arnolfo di Cambio Ferrer Bassa Pucelle Jean Bayeux Tapestry
 Nicola Pisano Pietro Cavallini Altichiera da Zevio Matthew Paris
 Giovanni Pisano Cimabue Tomasso da Modena Master Boucicaut
 Tino di Camaino Duccio di Buonisegna Traini Francesco Illuminated Manuscripts
 Andrea Pisano Simone Martini Giovannino de' Grassi Master Hohenfurt
 Claus Sluter Maso di Banco Roberto Oderisi Henri Belechose
 
 Exploration: Revelations (Art of the Apocalypse)
 
 Exploration: Gothic Era  (Gothic and Early Renaissance)
 

 


PAINTING
 

 



Vitale da Bologna

Guariento d'Arpo

 
 

Vitale da Bologna

(b before 1309; d between 1359 and 1361).
Italian painter, Bolognese school

The earliest documentary references to Vitale concern S Francesco, Bologna, where he was paid for decorating a chapel in 1330 and where he witnessed deeds in 1334. He was probably born before 1309, since he would have been at least 25 to act as a witness. The earliest works attributed to him are the frescoes of standing saints and Abraham and the Blessed Souls (Bologna, S Martino), which show a strong Riminese influence in the cool, wine-red and olive tones and lean, high-cheeked faces. Vitale’s work continued to reflect Riminese iconography and features, particularly the vivid characterizations associated with Pietro da Rimini, but his style became less dependent upon these sources. He was paid for paintings in a chapel and the guests’ refectory of S Francesco in 1340. The Last Supper from the refectory (detached; Bologna, Pin. N.) retains the cool pinks and rows of standing saints of the S Martino frescoes, but the modelling of the figures is richer and more expressive. The long table and symmetrical architecture are inspired by Giotto’s frescoes in the Bardi Chapel, Santa Croce, Florence, and the radical transformation in Vitale’s style, which set him apart from his Bolognese contemporaries, was partly due to Giotto’s influence. Above all, however, his style was influenced by the Master of the Triumph of Death at Pisa. The lively gestures, the loose modelling and lime-green and vermilion palette of Bolognese illuminators, particularly the Illustratore, also began to influence Vitale. Bolognese illumination provided a repertory of genre observation that undoubtedly affected his wide range of iconographic innovations. These varied influences can be seen in the uneven but lively quality of the Crucifixion (c. 1335–40; Philadelphia, PA, Mus. A.). Vitale’s work is also often compared to that of Sienese painters. There is no substantial evidence of direct influence but his use of dramatic facial types reminiscent of Pietro Lorenzetti and a decorative richness akin to Simone Martini’s painting suggest that he knew their work.

 


Vitate (degii Equi) da Bologna
St George 's Battle with the Dragon
around 1350
Pinacoteca Nazionale, Bologna

 


Vitate (degii Equi) da Bologna
Madonna
1345
Museo Civico d'Arte Industriale, Imola

 

 


Vitate (degii Equi) da Bologna
Crucifixion

   
 


Vitate (degii Equi) da Bologna
Bishop Theophilus Taking the Body of the Saint to Constantinople.
begun 1351
Pinacoteca Nazionale, Bologna This shows an episode from the Life of St Anthony.

   
   
 
Guariento d'Arpo
 

( fl Padua, 1338; d 1367–70).

Italian painter. He was the leading painter of his time in Padua and is first recorded there as a master in 1338. The origin of his eclectic but highly distinctive style is not to be explained in terms of the influence of an ill-defined regional Byzantinism, as posited in older accounts, but rather as an alert and discriminating synthesis of trends current in the Veneto following visits to the area by such artists as Giotto and Giovanni Pisano. Guariento’s style combines elements obviously drawn from Giotto’s work in Padua and elsewhere with a more overtly Gothic sense of line and rhythm and a dramatic approach to narrative, occasionally verging on caricature.

   
 

Guariento d'Arpo
Angel
1354
Museo Civico, Padua

   
 


Guariento d'Arpo
Angel
1354
Museo Civico, Padua

   
 

Guariento d'Arpo
Angel
1354
Museo Civico, Padua

   
 

Guariento d'Arpo
Archangel
1350
Museo Civico, Padua

   
 

Guariento d'Arpo
Angel
1350
Museo Civico, Padua

   
 

Guariento d'Arpo
Madonna of Humility
1345

   
 

Guariento d'Arpo
Virgin and Child enthroned

   
 

Guariento d'Arpo
Coronation of the Virgin Altarpiece
1344

 

 

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