Bible



The sacred scriptures of Judaism and Christianity. The Christian Bible consists of the Old Testament and the New Testament (qq.v.), with the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox versions of the Old Testament being slightly larger because of their acceptance of certain books and parts of books considered apocryphal by Protestants. The Jewish Bible includes only the books known to Christians as the Old Testament. The arrangements of the Jewish and Christian canons differ considerably. The Protestant and Roman Catholic arrangements more nearly match one another.

Traditionally the Jews have divided their scriptures (i.e., the Old Testament) into three parts: the Torah (the “Law”), or Pentateuch; the Nevi'im (the “Prophets”); and the Ketuvim (the “Writings”), or Hagiographa. The Pentateuch, together with the book of Joshua (hence the name Hexateuch) can be seen as the account of how Israel became a nation and of how it possessed the Promised Land. The division designated as the “Prophets” continues the story of Israel in the Promised Land, describing the establishment and development of the monarchy and presenting the messages of the prophets to the people. The “Writings” include speculation on the place of evil and death in the scheme of things (Job and Ecclesiastes), the poetical works, and some additional historical books.

In the Apocrypha of the Old Testament, various types of literature are represented; the purpose of the Apocrypha seems to have been to fill in some of the gaps left by the indisputably canonical books and to carry the history of Israel to the 2nd century BC.

The New Testament is by far the shorter portion of the Christian Bible, but, through its associations with the spread of Christianity, it has wielded an influence far out of proportion to its modest size. Like the Old Testament, the New Testament is a collection of books, including a variety of early Christian literature. The four Gospels deal with the life, the person, and the teachings of Jesus, as he was remembered by the Christian community. The book of Acts carries the story of Christianity from the Resurrection of Jesus to the end of the career of Paul. The Letters, or Epistles, are correspondence by various leaders of the early Christian church, chief among them the Apostle Paul, applying the message of the church to the sundry needs and problems of early Christian congregations. The Book of Revelation (the Apocalypse) is the only canonical representative of a large genre of apocalyptic literature that appeared in the early Christian movement.



(Encyclopaedia Britannica)

 
 


 

 

 

Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld

born March 26, 1794, Leipzig, Saxony, Germany
died May 24, 1872, Dresden, Germany

painter and designer who figured importantly in the German Nazarene movement.
Schnorr received his earliest instruction from his father, Hans Veit Schnorr, a draftsman, engraver, and painter, and in 1818 he went to Rome where he was associated with a group of painters who called themselves the Nazarenes, or Lucas Brotherhood (Lukasbund). Inspired by early Renaissance art and the works of Albrecht Dürer, Schnorr's oil paintings were characterized by a precise linearity, clear bright colours, and a multiplicity of symbolic detail. He shared his fellow Nazarenes' interest in a revival of fresco painting and the creation of a “monumental art.” Together with Johann Overbeck, Peter von Cornelius, and Philipp Veit, Schnorr received a commission to decorate the entrance hall of the Villa Massimo with frescoes after Ludovico Ariosto.
Schnorr left Rome and settled in Munich in 1827, where he served King Ludwig I, transplanting to Germany the art of wall painting learned in Italy. For his Picture Bible (1852–60), an English commission arising out of a visit to London in 1851, he designed over 200 woodcuts. He also designed the windows, manufactured at the royal factory at Munich, for St.Paul's Cathedral, London.
 
 

 
 


Julius Schnoor von Carolsfeld




Das Buch der Bucher in Bilden


 

 


Old Testament

 
Creation Day 1



 
Creation Day 2



 
Creation Day 3



 
Creation Day 4



 
Creation Day 5



 
Creation Day 6



 
Creation Day 7



 
Adam & Eve Eat Forbidden Fruit



 
Adam & Eve Hide From God



 
Adam & Eve Expelled From Eden

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy