John Flaxman


(b York, 6 July 1755; d London, 9 Dec 1826).

English sculptor, designer and teacher. He was the most famous English Neo-classical sculptor of the late 18th century and the early 19th. He produced comparatively few statues and portrait busts but devoted himself to monumental sculpture and became noted for the piety and humanity of his church monuments. He also had an international reputation based on his outline illustrations to the works of Homer, Aeschylus and Dante, which led him to be described by Goethe as ‘the idol of all dilettanti’. More recently attention has focused on his models for pottery and silver, and he has emerged as an important pioneer in the development of industrial design.

 



John Flaxman


The Odyssey of Homer

1805


Tate Gallery, London

 

 

 
 
Title Page


 
 
The Descent of Minerva to Ithaca


 
 
Phemius Singing to the Suitors


 
 
Penelope Surprised by the Suitors


 
 
Telemachus in Seach of his Father


 
 
Council of Jupiter, Minerva, and Mercury


 
 
Nestor's Sacrifice


 
 
Penelope's Dream


 
 
Mercury's Message to Calypso
   
Leucothea Preserving Ulysses


 
 
Nausicaa Throwing the Ball


 
 
Ulysses Following the Car of Nausicaa


 
 
Ulysses on the Hearth Presenting Himself to Alcinous and Arete


 
 
Ulysses Weeps at the Song of Demodocus


 
 
Ulysses Giving Wine to Polyphemus


 
 
The King of the Lestrigens Seizing One of the Companions of Ulysses


 
 
Ulysses at the Table of Circe


 
 
Ulysses Terrified by the Ghosts


 
 
Morning


 
 
The Sirens


 
 
Scylla


 
 
Lampetia Complaining to Apollo


 
 
Ulysses Asleep Laid on his Own Coast by the Phaeacian Sailors


 
 
Ulysses Conversing with Eumaeus


 
 
Apollo and Diana Discharging their Arrows


 
 
Minerva Restoring Ulysses to his Own Shape


 
 
Ulysses and his Dog


 
 
Ulysses Preparing to Fight with Irus


 
 
Euryclea Discovers Ulysses


 
 
The Harpies Going to Seize the Daughters of Pandarus


 
 
Penelope Carrying the Bow of Ulysses to the Suitors


 
 
Ulysses Killing the Suitors


 
 
The Meeting of Ulysses and Penelope


 
 
Mercury Conducting the Souls of the Suitors to the Infernal Regions


 
 
Ulysses Departing from Lacedaemon for Ithaca, with his Bride Penelope
   

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