Art of the 20th Century

 



Art Styles in 20th century Art Map



 




Eduardo Paolozzi


 


 

 


I was a Rich Man's Plaything

 


Eduardo Paolozzi


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, CBE, FRA (March 7, 1924 – April 22, 2005), was a Scottish sculptor and artist.

Paolozzi was born in Leith in north Edinburgh, the eldest son of Italian immigrants. In June 1940, when Italy declared war on Britain, Paolozzi was interned (along with most other Italian men in Britain). During his three-month internment at Saughton prison his father, grandfather and uncle, who had also been detained, were among the 446 Italians who drowned when the ship carrying them to Canada, the Arandora Star, was sunk by a German U-Boat. He studied at the Edinburgh College of Art in 1943, briefly at the St Martin's School of Art in 1944, and then at the Slade School of Art in London from 1944 to 1947, after which he worked in Paris, France. Largely a surrealist, Paolozzi came to public attention in the 1960s by producing a range of striking screenprints. Paolozzi was a founder of the Independent Group, which is seen as a precursor to the '60s British pop art movement. His 1947 collage I was a rich man's plaything, is sometimes labelled the first true instance of Pop Art, although he always described his work as surrealist. Latterly he became better known as a sculptor. Paolozzi is known for producing largely lifelike statuary works, but with rectilinear (often cubic) elements added or removed, or the human form deconstructed in a cubist manner.
He taught sculpture and ceramics at a number of institutions, including University of California, Berkeley (in 1968) and at the Royal College of Art. Paolozzi has a long association with Germany, having worked in Berlin from 1974 as part of the Artists Exchange Scheme. He was a professor at the Fachhochschule in Cologne from 1977 to 1981, and later taught sculpture at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich. Paolozzi was awarded the CBE in 1968 and in 1979 he was elected to the Royal Academy. During the late 60s he started contributing to literary magazine Ambit, which began a lifelong collaboration. He became the Her Majesty's Sculptor in Ordinary for Scotland in 1986, holding the office until his death. He became Sir Eduardo Paolozzi upon his knighthood in 1989. In 1994 Paolozzi gave the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art a large body of his works, and much of the content of his artist's studio. In 1999 the National Galleries of Scotland opened the Dean Gallery to display this collection, and the gallery displays a recreation of Paolozzi's studio, with its contents evoking the original London and Munich locations. In 2001 Paolozzi suffered a near-fatal stroke (causing an incorrect magazine report that he had died).

 


Meet the People
 

 


Sack-o-sauce
 
1948

 


Real Gold
 

 


Was This Metal Monster Master - or Slave?

 


Fisherman and Wife
 

 


Real Gold
 
1949

 


Evadne in Green Dimensions

 


It's a Psychological Fact Pleasure Helps your Disposition
 
1948

 


Marine Composition
 
1950

 


Experience

 


Futurism at Lenabo
 
1964

 


Reality

 


Wittgenstein in New York
 
1964

 


Wittgenstein the Soldier
 

 


Wittgenstein at the Cinema Admires Betty Grable
 

 


7 Pyramide in form einer achtel skugel
 
1967

 


Donald Duck Meets Mondrian
 

 


Ernie and T.T. at St Louis Airport
 

 


Formica-Formikel

 


Secrets of Internal Combustion Engine
 

 


Memory Core Units
 

 


The Silken World of Michelangelo
 

 


Untitled

 


Untitled

 


Windtunnel Test
 

 


Yours Till the Boys Come Home
 
1951

 


The Ultimate Planet
 
1952

 


Four Stills from the History of Nothing
 

 


Conjectures to Identity
 
1963

 


Poster

 


Untitled

 


Untitled

 


Untitled

 


Untitled

 


Untitled

 


Untitled

 


Untitled

 


Untitled

 

Untitled
 


Great Ormand St

 


Newton Figure

 

Standing Figure
 
1958
 

Mr Cruikshank
 
 

Forms on a Bow
 
1949
 

Paris Bird
 
 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy