Art of the 20th Century

 



Art Styles in 20th century - Art Map



 







Boris Kustodiev




 


 

Boris Kustodiev

 

(b Astrakhan, 7 March 1878; d Leningrad [now St Petersburg], 26 May 1927).

 Russian painter and stage designer. While studying at the Astrakhan Theological School, he was impressed in 1887 by an exhibition of the Russian Realist painters, the Wanderers, and he subsequently decided to become a painter. In 1896 he enrolled at the Academy of Arts, St Petersburg, where he studied with Il’ya Repin. In 1904 he studied briefly in Paris under René Menard (1869–1930) and travelled to Spain, where he especially admired the paintings of Diego Velázquez. Like Andrey Ryabushkin before him, Kustodiyev concentrated on painting Russian provincial festivities, as in Shrovetide (1916; St Petersburg, Rus. Mus.). But in his paintings of the merchant class Kustodiyev added a new note of satire. Using the bright reds and blues of Russian folk art, he delighted in painting the merchants’ plump wives in their leisure activities. One of his most striking images is Merchant’s Wife Drinking Tea (1918; St Petersburg, Rus. Mus.), where the ample figure dominates the tea table and the surrounding area by her bulk and her self-satisfied expression. She is as round and as succulent as the fruit on the table. This work, like many others, has an oriental richness of colour that Kustodiyev saw as part of his Astrakhan heritage.

 

 


Self-Portrait
1912


 

Church Parade of the Finnish Life Guard Regiment
1906


 


Morning


 


Portrait of Maria Chalialpina


 


Portrait of the Artist's Wife


 


Portrait of Yulia Kustodieva, the Artist's Wife


 


Russian Venus


 

Odalisque


 

Reclining Nude


 

Belle
1915



 


Belle


 


Belle


 


Winter


 


Winter


 


Renee Notgaft


 


Portrait of
Fiodor Shalyapin
1920


 


Portrait of Fiodor Chaliapin


 


Portrait of Fiodor Chaliapin


 


Vasily Mathe



 


Portrait of Renee Notgaft


 


A Nun

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