Visual History of the World

(CONTENTS)
 

 


HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION & CULTURE

From Prehistoric to Romanesque  Art
Gothic Art
Renaissance  Art
Baroque and Rococo Art
The Art of Asia
Neoclassicism, Romanticism  Art
Art Styles in 19th century
Art of the 20th century
Artists that Changed the World
Design and Posters
Photography
Classical Music
Literature and Philosophy

Visual History of the World
Prehistory
First Empires
The Ancient World
The Middle Ages
The Early Modern Period
The Modern Era
The World Wars and Interwar Period
The Contemporary World

Dictionary of Art and Artists

 




The Contemporary World

1945 to the present



After World War II, a new world order came into being in which two superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, played the leading roles. Their ideological differences led to the arms race of the Cold War and fears of a global nuclear conflict. The rest of the world was also drawn into the bipolar bloc system, and very few nations were able to remain truly non-aligned. The East-West conflict came to an end in 1990 with the collapse of the Soviet Union and the consequent downfall of the Eastern Bloc. Since that time, the world has been driven by the globalization of worldwide economic and political systems. The world has, however, remained divided: The rich nations of Europe, North America, and East Asia stand in contrast to the developing nations of the Third World.



The first moon landing made science-fiction dreams reality in the year 1969.
Space technology has made considerable progress as the search for new
possibilities of using space continues.

 

 


The United States: Global Power
 


SINCE 1945
 

 



see also: United Nations member states -
United States of America

 

The United States emerged economically strengthened from World War II and, in the postwar years, became the political and cultural leader of the Wrest as the two-state bloc system began to take shape. It stood in opposition to the Soviet Union during the Cold War, which lasted until 1991. Internally, the civil rights movement and protests against the Vietnam War ushered in a liberalization of society in the 1960s. As a global superpower, the United States has since 1991 seesawed between global cooperation and efforts toward hegemony. Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States and the Western world are confronting the challenge of international terrorism.

 


"American way of life"
 


see also: Pop Art

see also:
Andy Warhol

see also: Idols (Elvisiana. Elvis Presley-Pop Idol. Marilyn Monroe "American symbol")

see also: Superstar Stormy Daniels
 

 


Warhol's Jews: Ten Portraits Reconsidered at the Contemporary Jewish Museum

Unlike many of Warhol's portraits, Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century depicts subjects whom the artist never met, because none of the subjects were alive at the time. Warhol was evasive when asked to divulge his selection criteria for the series and once told a reporter that he chose these ten subjects "because I liked the faces."

A sustained process of research and discussion resulted in the selection of a group of Jewish figures representing great achievement in the arts, sciences, philosophy, law, and politics:
1.celebrated French actress Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923);
2.the first Jewish Justice of the United States Supreme Court, Louis Brandeis (1856-1941);
3.renowned philosopher and educator Martin Buber (1878-1965);
4.the great theoretical physicist, Albert Einstein (1897-1955);
5.the hugely influential founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, Sigmund Freud (1856-1939);
6.vaudeville, stage and film comedians, the Marx Brothers: Chico (1887-1961), Groucho (1890-1977), and Harpo (1888-1964);
7.Israel's fourth Prime Minister and one of the founders of the State of Israel, Golda Meir (1898-1978);
8.distinguished American composer George Gershwin (1898-1937);
9.the eminent novelist, Franz Kafka (1883-1924);
10.avant-garde American writer, poet and playwright Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).
 

 


Andy Warhol
Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century


Franz Kafka, George Gershwin, Sarah Bernhardt;
Martin Buber, Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud;
Gertrude Stein, Louis Brandeis, Golda Meir;


Andy Warhol
Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century


The Marx Brothers

 


Andy Warhol Triptico de Jackie

 


Andy Warhol The Twenty-Five Marilyns; Double Elvis

 

see also:

Idols (Elvisiana. Elvis Presley-Pop Idol. Marilyn Monroe "American symbol")

 

 


Marilyn Monroe


Marilyn Monroe

Main
American actress
original name Norma Jean Mortenson, also called Norma Jean Baker

born June 1, 1926, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.
died Aug. 5, 1962, Los Angeles

American actress who became a major sex symbol, starring in a number of commercially successful motion pictures during the 1950s.

Norma Jean Mortenson later took her mother’s name, Baker. Her mother was frequently confined in an asylum, and Norma Jean was reared by 12 successive sets of foster parents and, for a time, in an orphanage. In 1942 she married a fellow worker in an aircraft factory, but they divorced soon after World War II. She became a popular photographer’s model and in 1946 signed a short-term contract with Twentieth Century Fox, taking as her screen name Marilyn Monroe. After a few brief appearances in movies made by the Fox and Columbia studios, she was again unemployed, and she returned to modeling for photographers. Her nude photograph on a calendar brought her a role in the film Scudda-Hoo! Scudda-Hay! (1948), which was followed by other minor roles.



Marilyn Monroe

In 1950 Monroe played a small uncredited role in The Asphalt Jungle that reaped a mountain of fan mail. An appearance in All About Eve (1950) won her another contract from Fox and much recognition. In a succession of movies, including Let’s Make It Legal (1951), Love Nest (1951), Clash by Night (1952), and Niagara (1953), she advanced to star billing on the strength of her studio-fostered image as a “love goddess.” With performances in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), How to Marry a Millionaire (1953), and There’s No Business Like Show Business (1954), her fame grew steadily and spread throughout the world, and she became the object of unprecedented popular adulation. In 1954 she married baseball star Joe DiMaggio, and the attendant publicity was enormous. With the end of their marriage less than a year later she began to grow discontented with her career.

Monroe studied with Lee Strasberg at the Actors’ Studio in New York City, and in The Seven-Year Itch (1955) and Bus Stop (1956) she began to emerge as a talented comedienne. In 1956 she married playwright Arthur Miller and briefly retired from moviemaking, although she costarred with Sir Laurence Olivier in The Prince and the Showgirl (1957). She won critical acclaim for the first time as a serious actress for Some Like It Hot (1959). Her last role, in The Misfits (1961), was written by Miller, whom she had divorced the year before. After several months as a virtual recluse, Monroe died in her Los Angeles home in 1962, having taken an overdose of sleeping pills.

In their first runs, Monroe’s 23 movies grossed a total of more than $200 million, and her fame surpassed that of any other entertainer of her time. Her early image as a dumb and seductive blonde gave way in later years to the tragic figure of a sensitive and insecure woman unable to escape the pressures of Hollywood. Her vulnerability and sensuousness combined with her needless death eventually raised her to the status of an American cultural icon.

Encyclopaedia Britannica
 


Marilyn Monroe

 


Andy Warhol
Las dos Marilyns

 

 

Elvis Presley



Elvis Presley

Main
American singer and actor
in full Elvis Aaron Presley or Elvis Aron Presley

born Jan. 8, 1935, Tupelo, Miss., U.S.
died Aug. 16, 1977, Memphis, Tenn.

American popular singer widely known as the “King of Rock and Roll” and one of rock music’s dominant performers from the mid-1950s until his death.

Presley grew up dirt-poor in Tupelo, moved to Memphis as a teenager, and, with his family, was off welfare only a few weeks when producer Sam Phillips at Sun Records, a local blues label, responded to his audition tape with a phone call. Several weeks worth of recording sessions ensued with a band consisting of Presley, guitarist Scotty Moore, and bassist Bill Black. Their repertoire consisted of the kind of material for which Presley would become famous: blues and country songs, Tin Pan Alley ballads, and gospel hymns. Presley knew some of this music from the radio, some of it from his parents’ Pentecostal church and the group sings he attended at the Reverend H.W. Brewster’s black Memphis church, and some of it from the Beale Street blues clubs he began frequenting as a teenager.

Presley was already a flamboyant personality, with relatively long greased-back hair and wild-coloured clothing combinations, but his full musical personality did not emerge until he and the band began playing with blues singer Arthur (“Big Boy”) Crudup’s song “That’s All Right Mama” in July 1954. They arrived at a startling synthesis, eventually dubbed rockabilly, retaining many of the original’s blues inflections but with Presley’s high tenor voice adding a lighter touch and with the basic rhythm striking a much more supple groove. This sound was the hallmark of the five singles Presley released on Sun over the next year. Although none of them became a national hit, by August 1955, when he released the fifth, “Mystery Train,” arguably his greatest record ever, he had attracted a substantial Southern following for his recordings, his live appearances in regional roadhouses and clubs, and his radio performances on the nationally aired Louisiana Hayride. (A key musical change came when drummer D.J. Fontana was added, first for the Hayride shows but also on records beginning with “Mystery Train.”)

Presley’s management was then turned over to Colonel Tom Parker, a country music hustler who had made stars of Eddy Arnold and Hank Snow. Parker arranged for Presley’s song catalog and recording contract to be sold to major New York City-based enterprises, Hill and Range and RCA Victor, respectively. Sun received a total of $35,000; Elvis got $5,000. He began recording at RCA’s studios in Nashville, Tennessee, with a somewhat larger group of musicians but still including Moore, Black, and Fontana and began to create a national sensation with a series of hits: “Heartbreak Hotel,” “Don’t Be Cruel,” “Love Me Tender” (all 1956), "All Shook Up" (1957), and more.

From 1956 through 1958 he completely dominated the best-seller charts and ushered in the age of rock and roll, opening doors for both white and black rock artists. His television appearances, especially those on Ed Sullivan’s Sunday night variety show, set records for the size of the audiences. Even his films, a few slight vehicles, were box office smashes.

Presley became the teen idol of his decade, greeted everywhere by screaming hordes of young women, and, when it was announced in early 1958 that he had been drafted and would enter the U.S. Army, there was that rarest of all pop culture events, a moment of true grief. More important, he served as the great cultural catalyst of his period. Elvis projected a mixed vision of humility and self-confidence, of intense commitment and comic disbelief in his ability to inspire frenzy. He inspired literally thousands of musicians—initially those more or less like-minded Southerners, from Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins on down, who were the first generation of rockabillies, and, later, people who had far different combinations of musical and cultural influences and ambitions. From John Lennon to Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan to Prince, it was impossible to think of a rock star of any importance who did not owe an explicit debt to Presley.

Beyond even that, Presley inspired his audience. “It was like he whispered his dream in all our ears and then we dreamed it,” said Springsteen at the time of Presley’s death. You did not have to want to be a rock and roll star or even a musician to want to be like Elvis—which meant, ultimately, to be free and uninhibited and yet still a part of the everyday. Literally millions of people—an entire generation or two—defined their sense of personal style and ambition in terms that Elvis first personified.

As a result, he was anything but universally adored. Those who did not worship him found him despicable (no one found him ignorable). Preachers and pundits declared him an anathema, his Pentecostally derived hip-swinging stage style and breathy vocal asides obscene. Racists denounced him for mingling black music with white (and Presley was always scrupulous in crediting his black sources, one of the things that made him different from the Tin Pan Alley writers and singers who had for decades lifted black styles without credit). He was pronounced responsible for all teenage hooliganism and juvenile delinquency. Yet, in every appearance on television, he appeared affable, polite, and soft-spoken, almost shy. It was only with a band at his back and a beat in his ear that he became “Elvis the Pelvis.”

In 1960 Presley returned from the army, where he had served as a soldier in Germany rather than joining the Special Services entertainment division. Those who regarded him as commercial hype without talent expected him to fade away. Instead, he continued to have hits from recordings stockpiled just before he entered the army. Upon his return to the States, he picked up pretty much where he had left off, churning out a series of more than 30 movies (from Blue Hawaii to Change of Habit) over the next eight years, almost none of which fit any genre other than “Elvis movie,” which meant a light comedic romance with musical interludes. Most had accompanying soundtrack albums, and together the movies and the records made him a rich man, although they nearly ruined him as any kind of artist. Presley did his best work in the 1960s on singles either unconnected to the films or only marginally stuck into them, recordings such as “It’s Now or Never (‘O Sole Mio’)" (1960), “Are You Lonesome Tonight?,” “Little Sister” (both 1961), “Can’t Help Falling in Love,” “Return to Sender” (both 1962), and “Viva Las Vegas” (1964). Presley was no longer a controversial figure; he had become one more predictable mass entertainer, a personage of virtually no interest to the rock audience that had expanded so much with the advent of the new sounds of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and Dylan.

By 1968 the changes in the music world had overtaken Presley—both movie grosses and record sales had fallen. In December his one-man Christmas TV special aired; a tour de force of rock and roll and rhythm and blues, it restored much of his dissipated credibility. In 1969 he released a single having nothing to do with a film, “Suspicious Minds”; it went to number one. He also began doing concerts again and quickly won back a sizable following, although it was not nearly as universal as his audience in the 1950s—in the main, it was Southern and Midwestern, working-class and unsophisticated, and overwhelmingly female. For much of the next decade, he was again one of the top live attractions in the United States. (For a variety of reasons, he never performed outside North America.) Presley was now a mainstream American entertainer, an icon but not so much an idol. He had married in 1967 without much furor, became a parent with the birth of his daughter, Lisa Marie, in 1968, and got divorced in 1973. He made no more movies, although there was a good concert film, Elvis on Tour. His recordings were of uneven quality, but on each album he included a song or two that had focus and energy. Hits were harder to come by—“Suspicious Minds” was his last number one and “Burning Love” (1972) his final Top Ten entry. But, thanks to the concerts, spectaculars best described by critic Jon Landau as an apotheosis of American musical comedy, he remained a big money earner. He now lacked the ambition and power of his early work, but that may have been a good thing—he never seemed a dated relic of the 1950s trying to catch up to trends but was just a performer, unrelentingly himself.

However, Presley had also developed a lethal lifestyle. Spending almost all his time when not on the road in Graceland, his Memphis estate (actually just a big Southern colonial house decorated somewhere between banal modernity and garish faux-Vegas opulence), he lived nocturnally, surrounded by sycophants and stuffed with greasy foods and a variety of prescription drugs. His shows deteriorated in the final two years of his life, and his recording career came to a virtual standstill. Presley never seemed confident in his status, never entirely certain that he would not collapse back into sharecropper poverty, and, as a result, he seems to have become immobilized; the man who had risked everything, including potential ridicule, to make himself a success now lived in the lockstep regimen of an addict and recluse. Finally, in the summer of 1977, the night before he was to begin yet another concert tour, he died of a heart attack brought on largely by drug abuse. He was 42 years old.

Almost immediately upon hearing of his death, mourners from around the world gathered at Graceland to say farewell to the poor boy who had lived out the American dream. In a way, that mourning has never ceased: Graceland remains one of the country’s top tourist attractions more than 20 years later, and Presley’s albums and other artifacts continue to sell briskly. Each August crowds flock to Graceland to honour him on the anniversary not of his birth but of his death. From time to time rumours have cropped up that he did not really die, that his death was a fake designed to free him from fame. Elvis impersonators are legion. His biggest fans—working-class white women, almost exclusively—have passed their fanaticism on to their children, or at least to a surprising number of daughters. “Elvis has left the building,” but those who are still inside have decided to carry on regardless. Once more, Elvis Presley is triumphant, although this triumph is shadowed by something far less than happiness.

Dave Marsh

Encyclopaedia Britannica



Elvis Presley

 


Andy Warhol
Elvis triple

 


Chris Consani

Elvis Presley & Marilyn Monroe
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

see also:

Superstar Stormy Daniels

 

Stormy Daniels


Stormy Daniels


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stormy Daniels (born Stephanie Gregory Clifford in Baton Rouge, Louisiana on March 17, 1979, also known as Stormy Waters and simply Stormy, is an American pornographic actress, screenwriter, and director. She chose her stage name to reflect her love of Mötley Crüe whose bassist Nikki Sixx named his daughter Stormy. In 2009 a recruitment effort led her to consider challenging incumbent David Vitter in 2010 Republican Senate primary in her native Louisiana.

Daniels' parents divorced when she was four. She was subsequently raised by her mother. Daniels has said of her childhood that she "came from an average, lower-income household...there [were] days without electricity." She attended a magnet school in Louisiana and was the editor of her high school paper and president of the 4-H club.

She began stripping at age 17 at a club in Baton Rouge then expanded to become a feature performer in September of 2000. While working as a feature she met with Devon Michaels, who was doing girl-girl scenes in a pair of upcoming movies—one for Wicked Pictures and one for Sin City, and invited Daniels to accompany her. Daniels accompanied Michaels to her Wicked shoot, where she met Brad Armstrong and co-starred with Michaels in her Sin City scene, which was American Girls Part 2. Afterwards, Armstrong invited Daniels to stay out with him where she continued doing girl-girl only scenes.

In July 2002, she was cast as the lead in a feature film for Wicked called Heat, where she did her first boy-girl scene, and in September of the same year she signed an exclusive contract with Wicked. In 2004 she won the coveted Best New Starlet Award from Adult Video News, which came as a complete surprise to Daniels as she was so sure Jesse Jane would win she made a $500 bet with another porn starlet. From 2004 until today she continues directing for Wicked and is their leading performer.

She has appeared in several popular men's magazines including Playboy, Hustler, Penthouse, High Society, GQ, and FHM. She has also written for FHM. Daniels also appeared in an episode of Real Sex where she is seen participating in 2001 Miss Nude Great Plains Contest. In early 2007, she appeared in Dirt on the FX Network, where she played a stripper who helps to set up a basketball player played by Rick Fox. Later in 2007 Stormy Daniels appeared in Maroon 5's music video for their song Wake Up Call as a pole dancer. She appears in the film The 40-Year-Old Virgin as the main character watches her in the video Space Nuts: Episode 69—Unholy Union. She also plays a Las Vegas lap dancer in Knocked Up, alongside fellow porn star Nautica Thorn. A deleted scene on the Virgin DVD includes her having dinner with producer Seth Rogen in a parody of My Dinner with Andre. She also appears in the fifth episode of the show Party Down.

She is married to Mike Moz, a publicist in the adult entertainment industry. On July 25, 2009, Daniels was arrested in Tampa on a misdemeanor involving a dispute with her husband.

A group of fans are attempting to recruit Daniels to run against Republican Senator David Vitter in Louisiana in 2010 The recruitment process is centered around the website DraftStormy.com. On May 21, 2009, she formed an exploratory committee. Daniels is not affiliated with a political party but is currently making a listening tour around Louisiana to focus on the economy, as well as women in business and child protection. On July 28, 2009, it was reported that her campaign manager had been targeted by a car bomb attack. If elected, she would likely retire from the adult industry.

 


see also: United Nations member states -
United States of America

 

 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy