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Baudry Paul

 

 

Baudry Paul
 

(b La Roche-sur-Yon, 7 Nov 1828; d 17 Jan 1886).

French painter. Like many artistic children from the provinces in 19th-century France, he went to Paris with a grant from his municipality to pay his tuition fees. He entered the studio of Michel-Martin Drolling in 1844 and enrolled at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1845. In five successive attempts at the Prix de Rome, he rose up through the ranks of the finalists, winning the first prize (which he shared with Bouguereau) in 1850 with Zenobia Found by Shepherds on the Banks of the Araxes (Paris, Ecole N. Sup. B.-A.). Critics had already noticed that he was more attracted by Venetian painting than was customary among candidates for the prize. This was reaffirmed by the works he sent from Rome to Paris, especially his Fortune and the Child (1853–4; Paris, Mus. d’Orsay), which was clearly indebted to Titian’s Sacred and Profane Love (Rome, Gal. Borghese).

 


Charlotte Corday

 

 

 

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