Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 
 

CHAPTER TWO
 

REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
 

PAINTING
SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
ARCHITECTURE - Part 1, 2, 3
 

 

SCULPTURE

 

CLAUDEL.

Rodin employed various assistants throughout his career. One of them,
Camille Claudel (1864-1943), has emerged as an important artist in her own right. Claudel entered Rodin's studio as a 19-year-old, and for the next decade she was his collaborator and mistress. Her work is strongly in her mentor's mode. Except for a detectable feminine sensibility (which is unlike Rodin's confident sense of the heroic), her best sculptures might be mistaken for his. Much of her work is autobiographical. Ripe Age (fig. 973) depicts a grisly Rodin, whose features are clearly recognizable, being led away with apparent reluctance by his longtime companion, Rose Beuret, whom Claudel sought to replace in his affections. Beuret is shown as a sinister, shrouded figure who first appears in Claudel's work as Clotho, one of the three Fates, ironically caught in the web of life she has woven. The nude figure is a self-portrait of the distraught Claudel, and she, too, evolved from an earlier work, Entreaty.

 



973.
Camille Claudel. Ripe Age. ñ. 1907. Bronze, 87.6 x 21.9 cm. Musee d'Orsay, Paris





Camille Claudel. Ripe Age. (details)




Camille Claudel. Ripe Age. (details)




Camille Claudel. Ripe Age. (details)




Camille Claudel. Ripe Age. (details)




Camille Claudel. Ripe Age. (details)
 




Camille Claudel.


Camille Claudel

born Dec. 8, 1864, Villeneuve-sur-Fère, Fr.
died Oct. 19, 1943, Montdevergues asylum, Montfavet, near Avignon


French sculptor of whose work little remains and who for many years was best known as the mistress and muse of Auguste Rodin. She was also the sister of Paul Claudel, whose journals and memoirs provide much of the scant information available on his sister's life.

Between the ages of about 5 and 12, Camille Claudel was taught by the Sisters of Christian Doctrine. When the family moved to Nogent-sur-Seine, the educationof the Claudel children was continued by atutor. Camille had little formal education from that point on, but she read widely in her father's well-stocked library. By her teenage years she was already a remarkably gifted sculptor, and her abilities were recognized by other artists of the time. When in 1881 her father was once again transferred, he moved his family to Paris. There Camille entered the Colarossi Academy (now the Grande Chaumière) and met a lifelong friend, Jessie Lipscomb (later Elborne). Her first extant works are from this period.

Claudel and Rodin probably first met in 1883. Shortly thereafter she became his student, collaborator, model, and mistress. While continuing to work on her own pieces, she is believed to have contributed whole figures and parts of figures to Rodin's projects of that period, particularly to The Gates of Hell. She continued to live at home until 1888, when she moved to her own quarters near Rodin's studio at La Folie Neubourg. By 1892 her relationship with Rodin had begun to crumble, and by 1893 she was both living and working alone, though she continued to communicate with him until 1898. From this point on she worked ceaselessly, impoverished and increasingly reclusive. She continued to exhibit at recognized salons (the Salon d'Automne, the Salondes Indépendents) and at the Bing and Eugène Blot galleries,though just as often she would utterly destroy every piece ofwork in her studio. She became obsessed with Rodin's injustice to her and began to feel persecuted by him and his “gang.” Alienated from most human society, living at a great distance from Paul—the one family member close to her—her condition overwhelmed her. On March 10, 1913, she was committed by force to an asylum at Ville-Évrard. In September 1914 she was transferred to the asylum of Montdevergues, where she remained until her death.

Encyclopedia Britannica
 

 

 



Camille Claudel.
The Prayer (Psalm)
1889




Camille Claudel. The Flute Player (The Little Siren)





Camille Claudel. The Waltz
Bronze




Camille Claudel. The Waltz
Bronze
1905
Musee de Poitiers (Poitiers, France)





Camille Claudel. Vertumnus and Pomona.
1905, marble




Camille Claudel. Vertumnus and Pomona. (detail)

 


Camille Claudel. Bust of Rodin.




Camille Claudel. Torso of a Woman.




Camille Claudel. Torso of Clotho.




Camille Claudel. Young Roman.

 
 

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