History of Photography


Introduction. History of Photography (Encyclopaedia Britannica)

A World History of Photography (by Naomi Rosenblum)

The Story Behind the Pictures 1827-1991 (by Hans-Michael Koetzle)

Photographers' Dictionary.
(based on "20th Century Photography - Museum Ludwig Cologne")


 

 



Photographers' Dictionary

(based on "20th Century Photography-Museum Ludwig Cologne")

 
 

 

 


Pierre-Louis Pierson
(1822-1913)
 

In 1844 Pierre-Louis Pierson began operating a studio in Paris that specialized in hand-colored daguerreotypes. In 1855 he entered into a partnership with Léopold Ernest and Louis Frederic Mayer, who also ran a daguerreotype studio. The Mayers had been named "Photographers of His Majesty the Emperor" by Napoleon III the year before Pierson joined them. Although the studios remained at separate addresses, Pierson and the Mayers began to distribute their images under the joint title "Mayer et Pierson," and together they became the leading society photographers in Paris.
Pierson's 1861 photographs of the family and court of Napoleon III sold very well to the public. Pierson and Leopold Mayer soon opened another studio in Brussels, Belgium, and began photographing other European royalty. After Mayer's retirement in 1878, Pierson went into business with his son-in-law Gaston Braun, whose father was the photographer Adolphe Braun.


Countess Castiglione, c. 1860.

 


The Gaze, 185657
Albumen silver print
Gilman Paper Company Collection, New York

 


Fright
186167

 


La comtesse de Castiglione
1895
 


La comtesse de Castiglione
1895
 


Countess Castiglione
1860s
Albumen silver print from glass negative

 


The Foot
1894

 


M. Pelletan

 


Rachel
1893

 


La Normandie
1895


 


De Dieppe
1895

 


Cardinal de Bonnechose
1864

 


Napoleon III and the Prince Imperial
1859

 


Reflet de Miroir de Police Vaurien
Profil dans la glace des deux bras de la Police
1894

 


Roses
1895
Booklet of albumen silver prints

 

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