History of Photography


Introduction History of Photography (Encyclopaedia Britannica)

A World History of Photography (by Naomi Rosenblum)

The Story Behind the Pictures 1827-1991 (by Hans-Michael Koetzle)

Photographers' Dictionary
(based on "20th Century Photography - Museum Ludwig Cologne")


 

 



Photographers' Dictionary

(based on "20th Century Photography-Museum Ludwig Cologne")

 
 

 

 


Lee Friedlander

(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Lee Friedlander (born July 14, 1934) is an American photographer and artist.
Friedlander studied photography at the Art Center College of Design located in Pasadena, California. In 1956, he moved to New York City where he photographed jazz musicians for record covers. His early work was influenced by Eugène Atget, Robert Frank, and Walker Evans. In 1960, the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awarded Friedlander a grant to focus on his art and made subsequent grants in 1962 and 1977. Some of his most famous photographs appeared in the September 1985 Playboy, black and white nude photographs of Madonna from the late 1970's.
Working primarily with Leica 35mm cameras and black and white film, Friedlander's style focused on the "social landscape". His art used detached images of urban life, store-front reflections, structures framed by fences, and posters and signs all combining to capture the look of modern life.
In 1963, the International Museum of Photography at George Eastman House mounted Friedlander's first solo museum show. Friedlander was then a key figure in the 1967 "New Documents" exhibition, at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City along with Garry Winogrand and Diane Arbus. In 1990, the MacArthur Foundation awarded Friedlander a MacArthur Fellowship.
Friedlander now works primarily with medium format cameras (e.g. Hasselblad Superwide). While suffering from arthritis and housebound, he focused on photographing his surroundings. His book, Stems, reflects his life during the time of his knee replacement surgery. He has said that his "limbs" reminded him of plant stems. These images display textures which were not a feature of his earlier work. In this sense, the images are similar to those of Josef Sudek who also photographed the confines of his home and studio.
In 2005, the Museum of Modern Art displayed a major retrospective of Friedlander works. In the same year he received a 2005 Hasselblad International Award. His work was displayed again by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art as a retrospective in 2008. Concurrent to this retrospective, a more contemporary body of his work, America By Car, was displayed at the Fraenkel Gallery not far from the museum.

 


Nude

 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 1963

 


PeeWee Marquette and Count Basie,
New York City
1957

 


Garry Winogrand
1957

 


Sweet Emma Barrett
New Orleans
1958

 


Boy in Window, Baltimore
1962

 


De De and Billie Pierce,
New Orleans
1962

 


Wade Ward's Granddaughters,
Galax, Virginia
1962

 


New York
1963

 


New York
1963

 


New York
c. 1963

 


Self-Portrait,
Haverstraw, New York
1966

 


Ken Clark
Alaska
1967

 


Lafayette, Louisiana
1968

 


Paul Tate,
Lafayette, Louisiana
1968

 


Arlene and Alan Distler
New Charity, New York
1969

 


Peter Exline
Spokane, Washington
1970

 


King Curtis
New York City
1970

 


Mechanic's Monument
San Francisco,
1972

 


John Paul Jones
1973

 


Leslie Katz,
Saratoga Springs, New York
1974

 


Arnold Crane
Chicago
1974

 


Nina Szarkowski,
New York City, New York
1976

 


Pittsburgh, PA
Plate 2 from "Factory Valleys"
1980

 


Pittsburgh, PA
Plate 3 from "Factory Valleys"
1980

 


Akron, OH
Plate 13 from "Factory Valleys"
1980

 


Pittsburgh, PA
Plate 22 from "Factory Valleys"
1980

 


Johnstown, PA
Plate 25 from "Factory Valleys"
1980

 


Akron, OH
Plate 36 from "Factory Valleys"
1980

 


Canton, OH
Plate 60 from "Factory Valleys"
1980

 


Neale and Margaret Albert
New York City
1981

 


Richard Benson,
Newport, Rhode Island
1984

 


Untitled

 


Topless Bridesmaid

 

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